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Apr 07

Lingo: Indigo for Java without WS-*

Java, Lightweight Containers, Microsoft, Open Source, Tech Add comments

Lingo is a new lightweight remoting / messaging library that smells a lot like Indigo in simple ways. The main difference is that the model isn’t baked in with WS-* XML blah.

It is cool that you have control over the messaging exchange patterns, and can do things like JMX over JMS very easily.

About Lingo

Lingo is a lightweight POJO based remoting and messaging library based on Spring’s Remoting which extends it to support JMS and support a wide range of message exchange patterns including both synchronous and asynchronous message exchange.

Current supported message exchange patterns include:

  • synchronous request-response (like RMI)
  • one way messaging (asynchronous invocation – like a JMS publish)
  • asynchronous consumption (like a JMS subscribe)
  • asynchronous request-reply (allowing the server side to asynchronously send one or more replies as the data becomes available).

You can think of Lingo as being conceptually similar to both Microsoft Indigo and JSR 181 in that it allows asynchrnous method execution, remoting and asynchronous messaging to be bound to existing POJOs (classes or interfaces) though it has no particular dependency on Web
Services infrastructure.

Lingo supports pluggable messaging bindings; the first binding is an efficient JMS implementation. Over time we’ll be adding other bindings to web services frameworks and other transports.

For more details of how Lingo works and what features it offers, see the Overview or try out the Example

Read more about the new: Lingo

One Response to “Lingo: Indigo for Java without WS-*”

  1. Rob Harrop Says:

    James sent the details of this over to me the other day and I have to say I was immensely impressed – it is extremely flexible and I am looking forward to putting it to good use in the future.

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